Allie

Paws for Thought on A Sneaky Trick

The image shows Fiji lying in her dog-bed

Hello everyone, it’s me – Fiji!

Today I want to tell you about a very clever and sneaky trick I played on my doggy sister, Allie. Well, to be honest, it’s a trick I think I’m going to have to play on her quite often.

It was time for me to go to sleep. I wandered over to my bed. And found my sister Allie already asleep – in my bed! What a cheek!

Okay, okay – I know my doggy sisters and I don’t actually have our own beds. We have three beds and we sleep wherever we choose to. But that’s hardly the point – Allie was asleep in my bed… or at least the bed that I wanted to sleep in right then.

I tried glaring at Allie, but she just ignored me and stayed in my bed.

I knew asking mom to get Allie to move wouldn’t work. I’ve tried that before and mom only pats me on the head and tells me to go and sleep on one of the other beds. That Allie got there first so she should be allowed to stay there.

So I knew I’d have to find another way to reclaim my bed.

I went over to mom and just stood there waiting. Eventually she looked up from the book she was reading and patted me. So I licked her hand, just as if I was asking her for water. She offered me water and I had a few licks to satisfy her. Then I followed mom back to the bedroom and continued just standing there and looking at her expectantly.

Mom asked me if I wanted to play and I wagged my tail enthusiastically. That was what I’d been trying to get her to do. But sometimes mom is a bit slow and doesn’t understand my very clear communication.

And, as soon as we started to play, allie jumped out of bed and came to join in with the game.

And I quickly jumped into my bed, snuggled up and went to sleep.

Mom told me I wasn’t very nice to Allie, but it’s not like I forced her to come and play – she did so entirely on her own. As I knew she would!

Don’t you think that was clever of me?

Paws for Thought on My Very Favourite Thing

Hi everyone, it’s me – Fiji!

My very favouritist thing in the whole wide world is guide dogging for mom. And running with dad. And Breakfast. And supper. And playing with my doggy sisters. And… Hang on a minute, mom wants a word with me….

Mom just told me that I can only really have one favouritist thing in the world. But I don’t agree with her – I think I can have as many favouritist things as I want. Because they are all my favouritist when I’m doing them.

Anyway, my other favouritist thing in the whole wide world is crunchwater. Because it’s cold and it’s yummy.

Crunchwater comes out of magic boxes in the very coldest part of the fridge. Dad or mom makes crunchwater by filling the magic boxes. I don’t think it’s actually crunchwater at this stage because occasionally some slops over the edge of the magic box and it tastes just like ordinary old water when we lick it up. So there’s definitely something magical about the little boxes and what happens in the coldest part of the fridge –the bit that mom’s just told me is called a freezer.

My doggy sisters and I get crunchwater as a special treat. Dad takes a magic box out of the freezer, removes pieces of crunchwater and tosses them towards my doggy sisters and me. And we leap into the air trying to catch them. Well, I leap into the air and usually catch my piece because I’m a guide dog and I’m just clever that way. My sisters aren’t quite as good as me – Emily mostly catches her crunchwater, but Allie is a bit hit and miss. To tell you a secret, she’s more miss than hit. But we love her anyway.

Emily and I crunch away at our crunchwater and it’s gone in a flash. As I eat it, my mouth and teeth get all cold for a bit, which is one of the best things about it. But Allie kind of nibbles at hers – she bites off a slither at a time and it lasts much longer that way. Sometimes it even leaves little pools of liquid crunchwater on the floor.

Dad and mom sometimes also have crunchwater, but they don’t eat it right. For some strange reason they put it into a glass with other liquid. I can’t understand why they do that… what a waste of wonderful crunchwater! But, as I’ve said before, sometimes humans are just weird.

Note from Lois: Craig and I first saw the term crunchwater in a tweet by Thoughts of Dog – @Dog_feelings and it just worked for us. That
Twitter account has given me hours of laughter and amusement and is well worth visiting!

A Guide Dog’s Joy and Excitement

the image shows Lois wearing a brightly coloured mask, standing outside with her guide dog, Fiji.

After almost six weeks of being confined to home during the Level 5 lockdown, I wasn’t sure how my guide dog would react to once again wearing her harness and working with me. Okay, I knew she’d pull like crazy, because that’s what she does after a few days without working. So I had no illusions about how much pulling a six-week break was going to warrant!

After working together for over four years I was fairly certain that the break wouldn’t impact on her ability to work. Or her enthusiasm for guiding. By now Fiji and I know each other pretty well. What did concern me slightly was whether her excitement would override her excellent training – would she remember what she’d been trained to do?

I decided to have back-up with me the first time we walked, just in case. So my husband joined us for our first time out. As did our youngest dog, Allie, who walked with Craig. At least, that was the plan.

What a bad mistake it turned out to be!

Allie is used to running with Fiji. And I really mean with her – they run side by side flawlessly. So, poor Allie didn’t understand why she and dad were walking behind Fiji and mom. She whined, and she pulled, and she did doggy star-jumps to try and catch up with Fiji and me. Which totally put Fiji off her game.

Fiji kept trying to see what was bothering her sister. At first, she tried turning around to see what was going on. When that didn’t work, because I kept her moving forward, she tried to walk into the middle of the road to try and catch sight of Allie out of the corner of her eye. In desperation we tried allowing Craig and Allie to walk ahead. Only then Fiji was the one pulling like a steam train to get back out front.

So we figured we’d just have to deal with two slightly crazy dogs. But at least Fiji and I got to be out front.

Apart from that, Fiji did well on her walk.

The second time we walked, Craig hopped on his bicycle and cycled round the neighbourhood, checking in on us every now and then as we walked.

Which was fine. Except that every time he cycled past us, Fiji wanted to dash off after him. When he was going in the same direction as us it wasn’t so bad – we simply walked a little faster until he was out of sight. But whenever he appeared in front of us and rode past, Fiji immediately tried to turn round and run after him. I didn’t know whether to laugh at her enthusiasm, or growl at her naughtiness.

Since then Fiji and I have been going it alone. And she’s working brilliantly. Maybe she’s burned off the initial excitement and she’s once again used to walking her routes. Maybe she was just distracted by Craig’s presence… and Allie’s. Regardless, Fiji and I have slipped back into the easy rhythm of working as a team. And I totally love the experience.

I’m grateful that Craig was willing to help me manage my anxiety on our first two walks. But it is immensely liberating to be able to walk on my own with my beautiful Fiji.
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Paws for Thought on the Couch

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The very first day mom brought me home from guide dog training school I had a meeting with my new doggy siblings, Eccles, Emily and Calvin. They told me that mom and dad were already mostly well trained, with one exception – we weren’t allowed to sleep on the furniture.

I gave the matter some thought and decided it would be okay to just sleep on the warm and comfy blankets scattered around the house. Except for anytime mom went out and forgot to take me with her – of course I’d curl up on the couch then. But never when mom and dad were home.

Everything changed the day my doggy sister Allie came to live with us.

When she walked into the house Allie leapt up onto the couch and curled up. No matter what dad did, she’d somehow find her way there. When he eventually put planks of wood across the couch she simply tried pulling the cushions out so she could sleep on them. And landed up tearing the cushions to pieces.

After two weeks dad gave up… and the no-couch rule went out the window.

It took a little time for my doggy sister Emily and I to break the years of no-couch conditioning. Then we decided to try our luck. Because, ultimately, it would be horribly unfair if mom and dad yelled at us for doing something that Allie was allowed to.

Now, though we don’t do it often because we have beautifully comfy dog beds, Emily and I sometimes curl up on the couch as well.

Which only goes to prove that you can teach old humans new tricks!

Hmm, I wonder if we can train mom and dad to let us sleep on the bed as well. It might be worth a try…

The photo shows Allie asleep on the couch.

Paws for Thought on My 2019 Wishlist

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I was perturbed to read mom’s last article and see no mention of me in her intentions for the year. So I’m going to correct her oversight and hope she pays attention to my Wishlist for 2019.

You’ll notice my needs are a lot simpler than mom’s. it’s okay that she wants to achieve lots of different stuff in 2019 – writing books, challenging herself, and continuing to build her profile and her business in all sorts of areas. But me, all the things I want to do are easily achievable. At least, I think they are.

So, here’s my Wishlist for 2019:

  • Walking with mom – go for 5 walks a week – if I were greedy, I’d ask for double that. So I think I’m being ultra-generous in just asking for 5, don’t you?
  • Working with mom 01 – I know mom enjoys practicing the routes she knows regularly and that’s fine with me, but it gets a little boring sometimes. So, I’d like for us to learn at least 1 new route this year.
  • Working with mom 02 – I think mom did quite well getting out and about with me last year. I want to challenge her to continue doing so, and to take me with her to lots of exciting new places as well as our old familiar haunts.
  • Running with dad – go for 3 runs a week. I know my doggy sister Allie and I can’t always run with dad since sometimes he has to do LSDs (long, slow runs for those non-runners who read this), and we’re too fast for LSD. But it’s important for Allie and me to keep up our mileage and keep our trim waistlines, so 3 runs a week should be okay.
  • Communicating – this year I want to do more Facebook posts and videos, because they’re fun. I’ll need to figure out a better way of stealing mom’s iPhone or laptop to stay in touch with my human and doggy friends on social media, but I’m sure I’ll find a way.
  • Eating – I want to try to Persuade mom to give me 3 meals a day. I know this may be a stretch goal but I think we should all try to reach for bigger goals sometimes. Besides,, mom has 3 meals a day, so why shouldn’t I?
  • Playing – in 2019 I want to play lots with my doggy sisters Emily and Allie. I know this is probably the easiest goal for me to achieve since we already play lots, but I’m including it for completeness’ sake.

There you go – my Wishlist for 2019. I realize I may need to retrain mom a little to achieve some of them. I also know some of them may not be easy but, like Walt Disney said, “If you can dream it, you can do it.”

And I assure you I’m already dreaming about that third meal!

Paws for Thought: You Can’t Choose Your Family.

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Whoever said you can’t choose your family was so right. Yet my sister Emily and I totally fell for it when mom and dad told us we’d be able to choose our new sibling from TEARS animal rescue. Because, if that were the case, how did we land up with the dog whose first act was to snap at me?

Let’s just say that our first few weeks with Allie were a little tense. I mean, how would you react if someone just dropped a brand new person into your fairly ordered life and said, “Hey, here’s your new sister – now everyone play nicely!” I’d bet you’d also be a little unsettled. So it took me and Allie a bit of circling round each other and muttering before we settled down to some serious play.

I’ll admit that everything became a lot less stressful when mom convinced me that Allie wasn’t going to take over my guide dog duties. And having an Allie-sister actually became fun when dad started running with both of us.

For those who want the details, Allie’s an 18 month old Labrador crossed with an alligator. At least, that’s how it seems since she loves to play-bite me on the legs. She’s full of energy and is intensely curious about absolutely everything. She’s somehow convinced dad that she’s allowed to sleep on the couch, which none of us other dogs have ever been allowed to do.

Allie used to cry when mom and I went for a walk, until dad bought her a toy that spits out pellets of food as she bats it around the house. Don’t tell mom, but sometimes I’m tempted to stay home to play with the toy instead of going for a walk. But I really love walking so I’m not too tempted. But maybe just once … just till I get one of those pellets!

Allie’s now so much part of our family that I’ll even let her drink out of my water bowl when I’m drinking, which I never let other dogs do. And it’s so much fun when Allie and me gang up on our oldest sister, Emily!

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After a somewhat rocky start, I’m glad Allie has become my sister. Though there are times she can be a bit of a handful. Which is why I snapped at her last week – but just a little bit, I promise. And maybe that was just payback for her snapping at me the first time we met…

When it comes down to it, even though it’s true you can’t choose your family, I’m pretty sure I’d have chosen Allie to be my sister even if I had been allowed to choose.

Welcome to the family and lots of wags, little sister, Allie!

Paws for Thought on My Life So Far

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I can’t believe I turned four years old last week. And that mom and I have been partnered for 2.5 years already. As I lie here snuggled up against the cold, I’ve been reflecting on all that’s happened in my life so far.

I’ll admit I was a little worried when mom and I first met. I mean, she seemed a nice lady and I was sure I could train her easily enough. Then, one day on class, she burst into tears and nothing I did seemed to calm her down. Nowadays when we give talks, mom explains that she’d become dependent on family and friends since her previous guide dog (my sister Eccles) had retired and that she’d stopped using her other senses and instincts to guide her. And she was terrified that she might do something to harm me or her.

Of course, I already knew that. I’d noticed my new mom was slightly hesitant when we walked. And that she wanted me to walk a lot slower than I like. And that she was always extra careful about stepping off and onto pavements. I tried to tell her that I trusted her and knew I could help her get over her anxiety about walking with me. But she didn’t seem to understand. So I realized I’d just have to show her.

It’s been wonderful to see how far mom’s come in the last 2.5 years – she’s far more confident, and is totally fine walking at my preferred pace. She’s also happy to go places and do things that she wouldn’t have done in those first few weeks. And mom trusts me and knows I’ll always be there to help her, no matter what. Unless she ever wants to try bungee jumping – then she’s on her own!

When I was training to be a guide dog we often used to wonder about the people we’d be partnered with. And, the day I met mom, I discovered it wasn’t going to be just her and me – that I’d have a whole human and doggy family! I love having doggy siblings to play with when I’m not on duty and me and my sisters Emily and Allie spend lots of time having mock fights and pulling rope.

The other really great thing about my family is that I’m allowed to take dad running. I wrote about that last time, so you can go back and read my previous article if you want to know more. Since I wrote the article, Allie’s started joining us on our runs which is also fun – especially when she accidentally slips off the rocks when we’re free-running on Muizenburg beach.

Finally, I’m really happy I still get to see some of the important people from before mom and I started working together. I see my puppy-walkers, Jenny and Mike, at events quite often and they even came to visit me at my home once. Mom and I sometimes do talks for the SA Guide-Dogs Association so I get to see Avril, Teagan, Cheryl and Charne as well, though I always try to remember to show them how well mom’s doing now.

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Sometimes when I meet young trainee guide dogs, I laugh at how young, naughty and puppyish they still are. But then I remember how mischievous I was as a puppy, and some of the antics I and my guide dog class got up to and I realize that even the naughtiest dog has the potential to become a wonderful guide dog one day.

I’ve added a few photos from my carefree puppy days with Jenny and Mike, one of the official photos from when mom graduated from guide dog school with me, and one of me and mom working together.

As I lie curled up at mom’s feet reflecting on my four years on this earth and the time I’ve spent as a working guide dog with my wonderful family, all I can say is wag, wag, wag, wag, wag, wag, wag!
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Introducing Puppy-Dog

Puppydog

I asked mom if I could write blog 200, and was upset when she told me it had already been posted – but not so upset that I’m not wagging like crazy at the chance to write this article instead.

So, today I’m going to be telling you all about a doggy friend of mine. No, this isn’t a post about my brand new sister, Allie. I want to get to know her a little better before I introduce her to you. Otherwise it’d be a bit like me writing a review of a book I hadn’t read. And yes, I do know I’m a dog and don’t often read books, let alone review them, but I do sometimes get to listen along when mom is listening to an e-book by audio, so the comparison isn’t as unlikely as you may have thought.

I actually want to introduce you to my small, fluffy toy dog friend, Puppy-Dog, who travels with mom when I can’t. Puppy-Dog is my proxy when mom travels overseas – it helps me to know she has a guide dog with her, sort of.

Dad found Puppy-Dog wandering around a shelf in a supermarket in Barcelona, Spain, about 6 years ago and she followed him back to the apartment where dad and mom were staying. Since then Puppy-Dog has gone with them on all their overseas adventures. She tries to get herself into photographs of the places she visits – and she’s pretty good at getting it right, too!

In fact, Puppy-Dog has so many photographs from her overseas trips over the past few years that she has her own blog. You can subscribe at www.puppy-dog.co.za

But she doesn’t stop there – Puppy-Dog also tries to hijack mom or my Facebook profile while she’s traveling and post pictures. In fact, she’s even been known to steal dad’s iPhone and post from his Facebook at times – not even I’ve managed to get that right!

A few people have asked me why Puppy-Dog didn’t post any photos during her recent journey to Germany and Poland. She told me to let you know she does have photos but she’s waiting for mom to help her write the captions since she’s too small to type. Besides, she’s actually only a stuffed toy guide dog, so she probably isn’t as good at spelling as I am – but please don’t tell her because it might upset her!

So that’s me for this time. And, while I didn’t get to write blog 200, at least I got to write number 201!

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