running

Paws for Thought on My 2019 Wishlist

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I was perturbed to read mom’s last article and see no mention of me in her intentions for the year. So I’m going to correct her oversight and hope she pays attention to my Wishlist for 2019.

You’ll notice my needs are a lot simpler than mom’s. it’s okay that she wants to achieve lots of different stuff in 2019 – writing books, challenging herself, and continuing to build her profile and her business in all sorts of areas. But me, all the things I want to do are easily achievable. At least, I think they are.

So, here’s my Wishlist for 2019:

  • Walking with mom – go for 5 walks a week – if I were greedy, I’d ask for double that. So I think I’m being ultra-generous in just asking for 5, don’t you?
  • Working with mom 01 – I know mom enjoys practicing the routes she knows regularly and that’s fine with me, but it gets a little boring sometimes. So, I’d like for us to learn at least 1 new route this year.
  • Working with mom 02 – I think mom did quite well getting out and about with me last year. I want to challenge her to continue doing so, and to take me with her to lots of exciting new places as well as our old familiar haunts.
  • Running with dad – go for 3 runs a week. I know my doggy sister Allie and I can’t always run with dad since sometimes he has to do LSDs (long, slow runs for those non-runners who read this), and we’re too fast for LSD. But it’s important for Allie and me to keep up our mileage and keep our trim waistlines, so 3 runs a week should be okay.
  • Communicating – this year I want to do more Facebook posts and videos, because they’re fun. I’ll need to figure out a better way of stealing mom’s iPhone or laptop to stay in touch with my human and doggy friends on social media, but I’m sure I’ll find a way.
  • Eating – I want to try to Persuade mom to give me 3 meals a day. I know this may be a stretch goal but I think we should all try to reach for bigger goals sometimes. Besides,, mom has 3 meals a day, so why shouldn’t I?
  • Playing – in 2019 I want to play lots with my doggy sisters Emily and Allie. I know this is probably the easiest goal for me to achieve since we already play lots, but I’m including it for completeness’ sake.

There you go – my Wishlist for 2019. I realize I may need to retrain mom a little to achieve some of them. I also know some of them may not be easy but, like Walt Disney said, “If you can dream it, you can do it.”

And I assure you I’m already dreaming about that third meal!

Paws for Thought on My Life So Far

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I can’t believe I turned four years old last week. And that mom and I have been partnered for 2.5 years already. As I lie here snuggled up against the cold, I’ve been reflecting on all that’s happened in my life so far.

I’ll admit I was a little worried when mom and I first met. I mean, she seemed a nice lady and I was sure I could train her easily enough. Then, one day on class, she burst into tears and nothing I did seemed to calm her down. Nowadays when we give talks, mom explains that she’d become dependent on family and friends since her previous guide dog (my sister Eccles) had retired and that she’d stopped using her other senses and instincts to guide her. And she was terrified that she might do something to harm me or her.

Of course, I already knew that. I’d noticed my new mom was slightly hesitant when we walked. And that she wanted me to walk a lot slower than I like. And that she was always extra careful about stepping off and onto pavements. I tried to tell her that I trusted her and knew I could help her get over her anxiety about walking with me. But she didn’t seem to understand. So I realized I’d just have to show her.

It’s been wonderful to see how far mom’s come in the last 2.5 years – she’s far more confident, and is totally fine walking at my preferred pace. She’s also happy to go places and do things that she wouldn’t have done in those first few weeks. And mom trusts me and knows I’ll always be there to help her, no matter what. Unless she ever wants to try bungee jumping – then she’s on her own!

When I was training to be a guide dog we often used to wonder about the people we’d be partnered with. And, the day I met mom, I discovered it wasn’t going to be just her and me – that I’d have a whole human and doggy family! I love having doggy siblings to play with when I’m not on duty and me and my sisters Emily and Allie spend lots of time having mock fights and pulling rope.

The other really great thing about my family is that I’m allowed to take dad running. I wrote about that last time, so you can go back and read my previous article if you want to know more. Since I wrote the article, Allie’s started joining us on our runs which is also fun – especially when she accidentally slips off the rocks when we’re free-running on Muizenburg beach.

Finally, I’m really happy I still get to see some of the important people from before mom and I started working together. I see my puppy-walkers, Jenny and Mike, at events quite often and they even came to visit me at my home once. Mom and I sometimes do talks for the SA Guide-Dogs Association so I get to see Avril, Teagan, Cheryl and Charne as well, though I always try to remember to show them how well mom’s doing now.

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Sometimes when I meet young trainee guide dogs, I laugh at how young, naughty and puppyish they still are. But then I remember how mischievous I was as a puppy, and some of the antics I and my guide dog class got up to and I realize that even the naughtiest dog has the potential to become a wonderful guide dog one day.

I’ve added a few photos from my carefree puppy days with Jenny and Mike, one of the official photos from when mom graduated from guide dog school with me, and one of me and mom working together.

As I lie curled up at mom’s feet reflecting on my four years on this earth and the time I’ve spent as a working guide dog with my wonderful family, all I can say is wag, wag, wag, wag, wag, wag, wag!
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Paws for Thought – But not When I’m Running!

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I’m really missing mom right now. I miss having her around… and I definitely miss working with her and guiding her to where she needs to go. I’m sure she’s having a wonderful time in Germany – wherever that is – and that she’ll be home soon.

But I miss her and can’t wait for her to come home.

I also really miss dad… and being able to take him on a run every now and then. So that’s what I’m going to talk about today.

There are huge differences in working with mom and running with dad. When I work with mom I watch out for her every step, checking what’s happening in front, beside and above me as well as what’s happening right at my paws. With mom I know to stop at steps and how to tell her if we need to step off the pavement to avoid an obstacle. I also have special techniques for helping mom cross roads, go up and down flights of stairs, find strategic route markers so she knows where we are and go round cars that are parked by the side of the road (we often have to walk on the side of the road where we live). And I know how to find escalators, which might just be my favourite part of my job. And mom rewards my good behavior by giving me small treats – which I definitely deserve.

With dad we mostly just run. Sure, there are places we stop (like at the train crossing and main road) but generally we don’t stop running for other things. It does mean I have to be super-aware of looking to see if any evil squirrels are around, but we’re usually running too fast for me to pay them much attention anyway. With dad I don’t stop for steps or find strategic poles since he doesn’t seem to use his sense of touch to help him discover where we are. And when I’m running with dad I can simply be a dog, rather than a guide dog.

The only problem is that dad doesn’t give me treats…. Which I’m sure I could teach him to do if I really tried hard.

Oh, I wanted to tell you that the photograph shows me proudly wearing the race medal I got for completing the 5 km Day of Races with mom last year, which is the only medal I’ve been given despite all the running I do…and I got it for walking with mom, rather than running with dad.

Which only goes to show that humans really don’t make sense.

It’s Nowhere Near a Marathon But…

People who have known me for a very long time would have been surprised to see what I was doing recently – taking part in a 5 km fun run/walk as part of the Cell C Day of Races. I’ll admit I was fairly surprised myself – usually my husband Craig is the one doing the races… sometimes joined by my guide dog, Fiji.

To be fair, it’s not the first time that I’ve walked a fun run. A few years ago my friend Sarah and I did so and earlier this year Fiji and I did our first park run. But it’s certainly not something I do on a regular basis – my normal form of exercise is to turn up the volume on my rock playlist on my iPhone or iPod and dance. And of course I also get regular exercise when walking with Fiji, which I try to do at least 3 times a week. So it’s not like I’m just sitting around.

Anyhow, to prove that we actually finished the fun run/walk, here’s a video of Fiji and me crossing the finishing line:

So, while we’re unlikely to be lining up on the start line of next year’s Two Oceans half marathon, as was suggested by a friend who saw my post about the race on Facebook, Fiji and I may do a few more park runs and even the odd 5 km fun run/walk in the future.

You just never know…

Perplexing Human Behaviour, Part 01

Cds 2017 02 19 16 05 12 A year ago if anyone had told me that I would be standing on my own on the side of Main Road handing out baby potatoes to the Peninsula marathon runners I would have shaken my head in disbelief and laughed uproariously.

And yet that’s exactly where I found myself at 08:30 AM on the morning of Sunday, 19 February this year.

To be fair, I wasn’t entirely on my own – I had Fiji at my side and we landed up chatting to a really nice lady photographer who was shooting the race. And besides, there were thousands of runners participating in both the half and full marathons, so I definitely wasn’t alone!

It’s the first time I ever got to cheer Craig on in person during a marathon. Seldom do the routes of his races bring him anywhere near home so it was pretty special being out there seeing him run past… okay, hearing him run past.

And, since I was there I took the opportunity of handing out some race fuel to some of the other runners who streamed past us. I couldn’t believe how fast the 2 kg stock of baby potatoes disappeared!

I certainly won’t forget the many words of thanks or the often humorous comments made by runners as they slowed down and reached for a potato –especially the marriage proposal I got. It’s amazing how marathon runners can find energy to crack a joke 26 km into a marathon! Yet lots of them do so

The photo is of Peter, a marathon runner who raises funds for the South African Guide-dogs Association through his running, who happened to run past as Fiji and I were there.

Talking of Fiji, I have absolutely no idea what she thought of the whole experience. Several times I caught her staring at the approaching runners in fascination and then turning to peer down the road as they disappeared off into the distance, twitching her ears in perplexity at this strange human behaviour.

I guess I’ll have to add it to the ever increasing list of times I’d love to be able to read my guide dog’s mind… or maybe not!

A moment of Absolute Indecision

When I was young someone told me that if a dog was sitting half way between two bowls of dog food they would starve because they wouldn’t be able to decide which bowl to go to first.

I’ve always had problems with that story – I simply couldn’t believe that a dog wouldn’t just go and eat one bowl and then rush over and eat the other. But a few days ago I was astounded to see that story play out in reality – and, well, let’s just say I was startled by what happened!

On this particular day Craig was getting ready to take Fiji for a run. He takes her running at least once a week and she absolutely loves it! I usually try to feed the dogs early on the evening Fiji is to run because the trainers at the SA Guide-Dogs Association for the Blind warned us a dog shouldn’t be active for 30 minutes after they eat.

When I realized how late it had become I decided to simply feed Fiji when she got back from her run, feeding the other dogs while she was away. It seemed like the perfect solution!

As usual, Fiji ran to Craig so he could attach her leash prior to the run. Then she ran full speed back to me, whining for her food. She reached me, immediately turned round and ran back to Craig, now whining because she wanted to run. She ran back and forth several times again, all the time whining desperately. It was as if she couldn’t make up her mind which to sacrifice –her run, or her supper!

Craig finally called her and told her they were leaving. With a final glance and heart-breaking whine in my direction, Fiji dashed off for her run. Of course, Fiji’s supper was waiting for her when she returned so she got to have her cake and eat it, as the old saying goes.

The point is, I’m no longer certain about the story I was told when I was young – if it were Fiji she might just starve from her inability to choose. And before anyone yells at me, I promise I’m not going to put it to the test – I’d never be that cruel to Fiji!

Watch the video to see and hear how excited Fiji gets when she knows she’s about to be taken for a run…

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